JMPD

JMPD vs SAPS - who is responsible for what?

The JMPD's mandate is derived from the South African Police Service 

Amendment Act 83 of 1998.

 

The department's functions include:

 

1. Traffic policing

 

2. Policing of municipal by-laws and regulations such as noise, rubble on the road reserve, etc

 

3. Prevention of crime

 

According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_Police_Service

(accessed 5 October 2014):

 

'SAPS has a responsibility:

1. to prevent, combat and investigate crime,

2. maintain public order,

3. protect and secure the inhabitants of the Republic and their property,

4. uphold and enforce the law,

5. create a safe and secure environment for all people in South Africa,

6. prevent anything that may threaten the safety or security of any community,

7. investigate any crimes that threaten the safety or security of any community,

8. ensure criminals are brought to justice and participate in efforts to address the             causes of crime’

By-Laws that are enforced by the JMPD:

 

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

 

For parking & traffic transgressions: 011-375-5911 / 5918

WHERE A VEHICLE IS PARKED IN CONTRAVENTION OF National Road Traffic Regulations, IT MAY BE REMOVED AND IMPOUNDED BY A TRAFFIC OFFICER AND THE OWNER SHALL BEAR THE COSTS OF SUCH REMOVAL AND IMPOUNDMENT.

Parking & Stopping Regulations, per the National Road Traffic Regulations
DO NOT STOP a vehicle::
  • Except to avoid an accident, or in compliance with a road traffic sign, or with a direction given by a traffic officer.

 

  • Alongside or opposite an excavation or obstruction on the public road

 

  • Within any tunnel or subway or on any bridge, or within 6 metres of any tunnel or subway or bridge

 

  • On, or within 6 metres from the beginning or end of, any part of such roadway where the normal width thereof has been constricted

 

  • In contravention of any road traffic sign

 

  • On the right-hand side of such roadway facing oncoming traffic

DO NOT PARK in the following areas:
  • On the sidewalk

  • In a loading zone

  • Within 1.5m of a fire hydrant

  • Within 5m of an intersection

  • Within 9m of a pedestrian crossing

  • At the entrance to any private or public road

  • Upon the actuating mechanism of a traffic light

  • On the right-hand side of the road, facing oncoming traffic

  • On a road that is less than 5.5m wide, unless it is a one-way

  • On a traffic island, in a pedestrian lane or in a pedestrian mall

  • Alongside or opposite another vehicle where the road is less than 9m wide

  • Within 1m of the edge of a road outside an urban area, unless it is in a designated parking bay

  • With your wheel further than 450mm from the edge of the pavement, unless permitted by a road sign

  • In such a place where you will obscure a road sign

  • Alongside an excavation if this will obstruct traffic

  • On or within 6m of where a roadway has narrowed

  • At any place where you shall cause an obstruction

  • Within 6m of a tunnel, subway or bridge

  • In a tunnel, subway or on a bridge

  • Incontravention of any road sign

YELLOW ROAD MARKINGS - What do they mean?

 

Parking restrictions exist for a number of reasons.  There may be a visual restriction that requires an area to be clear of parked cars so that others can drive through.  It might be that a road design cannot cater for the space a parked car takes up.  It might be that the location is too close to an intersection and to park a car will cause a danger to other road users.

YELLOW EDGELINE:
Single line CLOSE TO the kerb
NO PARKING / NO STOPPING
 
  • An edgeline means a line marked parallel to the left side kerb at a minimum distance of 150mm

  • The line may also be marked on the right hand side of the road.

  • This line imposes a mandatory requirement that drivers of vehicles shall NOT PARK adjacent to such a line.

  • There does not need at be a sign accompanying the yellow line.  The fact that there is a yellow line creates the offence.

YELLOW SHOULDER EDGELINE:

Single line FURTHER FROM the kerb
NO DRIVING & NO OVERTAKING between kerb & line
 
  • A shoulder line means a line marked along the road at a distance from the kerb that is greater than an edgeline but narrower than a full traffic lane.

  • This line imposes a mandatory requirement on drivers NOT TO DRIVE and NOT TO OVERTAKE

      on the area / shoulder to the left of such line.

  • Drivers must make every reasonable effort to stop / park their vehicles completely to the left of such line.

  • There does not need to be a sign accompanying the yellow line.  The fact that there is a yellow line creates the offence.

How to use Mini-Traffic Circles & Roundabouts

 

At all traffic circles and roundabouts, the rule of law is to YIELD to your RIGHT.

 

  • When approaching a traffic circle, always give way to any vehicle approaching on your right.

  • However, all vehicles ALREADY in the traffic circle have right of way.

  • At mini-circles, any vehicle that crosses the yield line before you has right of way.

Reproduced with kind permission of Safeways Publishing for The Official K53 Leaner's and Driver''s Manual

PARKTOWN NORTH - A COMMUNITY IN ACTION

© 2019  - PNRA   |   Terms of Use   |   Privacy Policy   |   PAIA   |   Designed by CINNABAR DESIGN STUDIO

  • facebook-square
  • Twitter Square